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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
religions. mitt romney is part of their religion and from the series. why was and i never questioned it up obama. he was a muslim. when these people would rather have a muslim as ftse it the president is not a muslim. a thinking of that. the service oft religion. north carolina being a big state on the bible state. what have we been able to see as far as the gov. romney and his mormonism? >> first of all, i would like to say, by a group with nancy a stake this country was founded on the religious and freed them. and didn't think somebody to from a to the governor susan in a-counter. prism of mama as tough as ever a question and he is now a increased imploded there is something he needs to be made it clear. it just happens to be he is a christian. that is a conversation was a negative into when a we should not be in the crux of the election. clarkson first thing we should do, which it said the harm strike you must. everything as an opponent, is should not be a realm possibility. they would test the things with it did or not. nobody is everything about mitt romney. he says he is a warning. i
out there are typically democratic blue-collar working-class men and women, roman catholic in religion -- certainly not all of them, and pro-union. these were the quintessential reagan democrats. they were in counties adjacent to pittsburgh like beaver and westmorland and washington and corrine and further to the east -- kim-shree and fayette. those counties have a propensity to vote republican, particularly in the elections. they are culturally conservative, pro-gun, pro-life, not particularly fond of gay- rights. then think of pennsylvania, draw a big t up the center of the state, fanned out across the new york border, not quite getting to erie or the northeastern part of the state, the big t -- that is the conservative area of the state. basically white, protestant, does not have a definable ethnic group in particular. once you get east of the susquehanna river, with the exception of a few counties, the demography changed sharply. let's get down to southeast -- philadelphia, heavily democratic -- democratic, but the suburban counties, and montgomery, chester, delaware, the swing tow
heretical they couldn't even imagine really the key not it is a common religion. the father of bashar al-assad had a muslim religious practice in order to become president of syria. they are quite far apart. but they share common ideology. syria has supported iran during the iran-iraq war because they hated iraq at that time. syria and iran share anti-americanism and the israeli attitude don't want a domination of architecture in terms of security of the region. so that's the shia crescent. the second is a growing sunni crescent but they still lack the pinch. this is saudi arabia's game. the crescent goes from libya for each of i'm too jourdan through the southern part of the western part of iraq and onto saudi arabia and down to the coast that i called the oil gold coast. we see selassie fighters, moving from libya and across saudi arabia, to iraq and into syria increasingly to join the victorian water. the opposition in syria is increasingly being joined by these extremist forces, which is one of the reasons it's so difficult for us to support them. saudi arabia and qatar are providing
but it's not all about religion. but it's about the complicated layers which makes up the region. the question about iraq, can it or will it regain? is already there. part of the problem in terms of what the government in baghdad is trying to do, it doesn't matter if it's malik your anybody else. he believes in a strong central government. certainly stronger than the constitution which is very weak. and was written by shia and kurds who said never again to a strong central government. but you have a government that functions that can protect the country inhabit as weak as it is and not be able to defend its borders and to project national power. so there are people, and the indy i surveyed that was a pulitzer but that was published in april or may says that maliki, love him or him from a certain more popular than he was six months ago. and his popular including among the sunnis and others who see him, not the election, they, they don't have to like them, it's not a popular to contest. i think the iraqis know that. but they don't know who else is there, and he has taken strong mov
religion. >> i'm not catholic. i am an episcopalian. i cannot answer that question. my husband is a catholic. we have raised our children as catholics. i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. it should be safe, legal, and repair. >> here is a valid point that is constructed. we have babies in america and i would that are being aborted simply because they are little baby girls, because the mother wants a boy instead of a girl. we have legislation before congress that prohibits sex selective abortion. she thinks it is ridiculous to talk about it. i think it matters to the little girls are being aborted. >> election day is one week away. >> i like watching the gavel-to- gavel coverage. it is the only place to get the real deal. i also enjoy news makers and the book programs. i like that the commentary is only intended to let you know what is going on. there is not too much analysis. opinion.rtainly is i appreciate all i can see through it and understand ithe programming itself. i can get my analysis elsewhere. if you want to see how your government works directly, c- s
a question. as a catholic, how has your view on abortion been shaped by your religion? >> i am not catholic. i am an episcopalian. i cannot answer that question. my husband is a catholic. my children are catholic. my grandchildren have just been baptized in a catholic church. we raise our children as catholics. i would be happy to talk about my view on abortion. my view on abortion is that it should be safe, legal, and rare. >> here is a point that is constructive and a difference between us. we have babies and america and in iowa that are being avoided simply because they are baby girls, because the mother wants a baby boy instead of a baby girl. we have evidence. we have legislation before congress that prohibits sex- selective abortions. i think it matters. it matters to the little girls who are being aborted. >> election day is one week away. find a key house senate races across the country on c-span, c- span radio, and c-span.org. >> now, a look at color model as a battleground state in the 2012 election. an update on the presidential race in that state. this is 25 minutes. host: all t
whether they get to eat. religion is banned. there is no rule of law, and perceived political infractions are met with harsh punishment, punishment, i should add, that is often needed out to the three generations of a person's family , and political offenders knows that when he goes to present his parents and his children will probably go with him. there are probably about 200,000 north koreans today in the gulag, and more than a million, perhaps as high as 2 million have already died there. the reason we know all of this and much, much more is thanks to the testimonies of north koreans to have escaped. these are the people i write about in my book. this knowledge comes to us despite the best efforts of the family regime to keep it secret. for more than 50 years, ever since the end of the korean war, north korea has been sealed off from the world's eyes. the family regime has pursued an isolationist policy and it maintains an iron grip on information, access to which is very strictly controlled. to give just one example, every radio must be registered with the government, and its style mu
for it. why should i pay for their birth control? it is against my faith. i have the freedom of religion and plan to exercise that by voting for romney. host: kathy sullivan. guest: in the first place, no one is proposing that taxpayers pay for someone's birth control. the issue is whether or not the employer has the right to discriminate against certain types of prescriptions, specifically birth control. this is a law we have had in new hampshire for several years now that employers have to cover prescription contraceptive. it has worked quite well. it has nothing to do with the tax payer. it is the expense of the employer, not the taxpayer. with respect to the health-care issue, i have to tell you something, i am the managing partner of a law firm. we have about 50 people who work there. up until couple of years ago, our health and -- health insurance premiums went up by double-digit numbers. for years. last year our health care premiums will have gone up by only 3% total for two years, which is unheard of several years ago. we kept looking at the double- digit percentage increases. i
in iowa. the issue of romney's religion is an issue i raised with him when he ran a pull your years ago and its initial history sensitive about man does not like to talk about. iowa republicans are dominated by evangelical christians. they are a bit leery of mormons. they don't understand it. they don't like to talk about it. no one will say i am not excited about mitt romney because he's a mormon, but they are aware of it. so that is an issue. it goes more to not whether someone will support mitt romney or not support mitt romney but the enthusiasm level they will bring the campaign. that diminishes it just a bit. so that's an issue. if you look at how the campaign plays out, i think that will be one of the majoridin fas this ectionwhich i thk is very cl and that is the enthusiasm level that each candidate can bring to the game. can mitt romney excite the republican base, which is largely evangelical christians in iowa? can barack obama excite the democratic base? he has a challen to excite voters in certain parts of the state. i think he has an edge because the democratic base is ki
really looking at it as a common religion. they are quite far along. syria and iran share americanism and the anti-israeli attitude. they share a common front. the shia crescent is there. and the growing [inaudible] the crescent goes from libya through egypt through georgia and the western part of iran and saudi arabia and the coast. moving across saudi arabia. increasingly the joint of sectarian war. the optimism in syria is increasingly being joined by these extremists. it is one of the reasons for supporting bad, saudi arabia is providing small arms. and we have to ask ourselves, what kind of extremism is coming out of that? >> we also have a situation of that which is maintained by russia. again, that group -- it goes back again. all relationships between russia and syria. they are both against the security council and it has to do with a great power in war over there. there is the issue of what issue is that that they are actually supporting? i have a syrian contact that i talked to a couple of days and he said syria? we think of ourselves as [inaudible] , but we do not know what
going to bordeaux and saying to people, "i've got a great new religion for you and, by the way, give up your wine." >> narrator: the task: to put on a suit and tie, and climb on your bicycle. >> the tried and true and well-worn method was knocking on doors. and so we knocked on thousands and thousands and thousands of doors. >> the mormon mission does teach you to deal with rejection. most people are not thrilled to see a pair of mormon missionaries on their door. >> narrator: rejection was at the heart of the experience. >> and it means cultivating your own inner spiritual life. where else are you going to get the resources and the strength to carry on this difficult work of knocking on people's doors and pleading with them to listen to you unless you feel like god is with you? >> narrator: and during that time, mitt was worried about the news from home. his father was running for president. >> we would get a hold of the herald tribuand kind of keep up on what was happening. >> narrator: the news was not good. george's campaign was in trouble. he had changed his position on the vietnam
for their birth control? it is against my faith. i have the freedom of religion and plan to exercise that by voting for romney. host: kathy sullivan. guest: in the first place, no one is proposing that taxpayers pay for someone's birth control. the issue is whether or not the employer has the right to discriminate against certain types of prescriptions, specifically birth control. this is a law we have had in new hampshire for several years now that employers have to cover prescription contraceptive. it has worked quite well. it has nothing to do with the tax payer. it is the expense of the employer, not the taxpayer. with respect to the health-care issue, i have to tell you something, i am the managing partner of a law firm. we have about 50 people who work there. up until couple of years ago, our health and -- health insurance premiums went up by double-digit numbers. for years. last year our health care premiums will have gone up by only 3% total for two years, which is unheard of several years ago. we kept looking at the double- digit percentage increases. i am very happy with wh
with china. we didn't have diplomatic religion. no concrete exchange. mostly balancing the soviet union during the cold war and talking in strategic terms about global affairs. in the '90s we began to pick up concrete exchanges and i was fortunate in to be china and increase trade and sellings arms to china cooperating in afghanistan and along the soviet border. but then along came [inaudible] so in the '90s the relationship had to adjust to two new dramatic element. the glue that held us together in the '70s and '80s. it was gone. the cold war was over. in a healthy way, e with had to greatly expand our relationship with china. but at the same time because of [inaudible] the human right issue got more prominent, and it was much more difficult to deal with china in terms of domestic politic. the '90s was a matter of dick and myself trying to struggle to how we can get the relationship on a broader basis and increase the exchanges. by the time we get to 2000 china is becoming a major power in the world and our interactions become in chris' and your turn much more extension and healthy an
big a role does your catholic religion play in your vote? >> i think it is big, i'm an ex-nun. and i -- the group of nuns that i associate with this day push for obama. >> reporter: is the pro-choice stand difficult for you to reconcile? >> it was difficult, it bothered me a long, long time. >> reporter: as did the same-sex marriage issue, that she ultimately looked past, but for others, some issues are non-negotiatable. >> i am pro life and wanted an administration that supports that view. and i would say the sanctity of life and marriage. >> poppy harlow, joining us, you have been all over the state, barack obama won in 2008 in that state. polls show he is ahead. but could mitt romney really make a run in these final three days? because it looks like the majority of people you spoke to in that piece are big advocates, big supporters of romney. >> reporter: well that is when you talk about mitt romney, they overwhelmingly backed santorum, but it seems that they moved into that romney camp, largely because they will oppose obama strongly on the same-sex marriage, and funding for cont
recounts his life in fractalist. in of africa, africa's culture, religion, history and identity. look for these titles in bookstores this coming we can watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> could have wanted more but in the conference can only do so much so want diversity. you want democrats, republicans, different parts of the country. everyone at different ages. we knew on the basis of nine, you can't make generalizations that are 100% certain. we may say as much in the book because conclusions are hypothesis that other people might run with but in order to make those hypotheses we needed a fairly diverse group. >> we also have the white house project for the last couple election cycles and several of the women identified several years before the 2008 election, kathleen sibelius, both in there, and barbara lee has been here several years from now when you did the last round with her foundation and talked about looking at women governors. we wanted to look at women governors who had been through barbara lee's training through the pipeline. we also m
catholic in religion. certainly not all of them, and pro-union. these, steve, are the quintessential reagan democrats. and they would be in counties adjacent to pittsburgh like beaver and westmoreland and washington and greene and further to the east cambria and fayette. of late those counties have a propensity to vote republican particularly in big elections. they are culturally conservative, pro-gun, pro-life, not particularly fond of gay rights. then if you think of pennsylvania and draw, and draw a big t up the center of the state and fan out across the new york border, not quite getting to erie and not quite getting to the northeastern part of the state, just a big t, that's the conservative blue area of the state. it's basically white, it's protestant, it doesn't have a definable ethnic group particularly. once you get east of the susquehanna river with the exception of a few counties, the demography changes sharply. let's go down to the southeast, philadelphia heavily democratic. but the four suburban ring counties, bucks, montgomery, chester and delaware, are the swing counties. two
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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